Town of Mono's COVID-19 Message Centre

Second Vaccination Message

This message from the Town of Mono was posted on 
January 11, 2021

Why is this scary pandemic still growing? — Why is it now out of control in much of Canada?

The problem is us.  It is our lack of success at transmission management, and our collective lack of will power.

We have been given advice when we should have been given orders.

We have had testing — mostly of symptomatic persons when we should have had widespread surveillance testing.  As humans we are usually able to learn, to adapt and to win — but we are now on our knees.

Advice rather than orders has not worked.  Good people rationalize their behavior, misuse concepts like bubbles and are unstrict with masking, distancing and not mixing outside their households.

People in high places could help by being positive role models rather than disregarding advice and travelling to beaches in the sun.

We spread the virus when we are infected — maybe we have just a slight cough or zero symptoms.  Especially we spread when we meet indoors with people from other households.  These are incendiary situations.

As this lethal pandemic has gone on for 10 months, we are all more than tired of the restrictions, are hurting in so many ways, and are growing immune to the worsening case and mortality numbers, ( E.G. TODAY’S — January 11, 2021 — CANADIAN NUMBERS:  Active COVID-19 cases: 83,346 | Recovered: 558,772 | Deceased: 16,950 | Total: 660,289).  Dufferin County has had as many new cases in the last six weeks as in the previous eight months.  Does that shake you — It should!  We see the numbers with a blur and usually are touched only by an infected or dying person.

Canada has COVID-19 vaccines and has been administering them for four weeks.  To date less than one percent of our population has received vaccination.  This vaccination rate is comparable to many other advanced countries — but it is too slow.  At this rate it would take a decade to vaccinate the accepting Canadian population!  The pace is improving.  Our Headwaters Hospital and the Wellington Dufferin Guelph health unit are now actively vaccinating.  The breadth and speed of vaccination will get better and better as we finesse the processes...

Now we have the UK COVID-19 variant, and the South African and the Brazil variant.  These are easier to pass on, although not more lethal.  The probability/hope is that these spreading variants, will be covered by current vaccines — the silver bullets which are the light at the end of a long tunnel.

We must remember: the problem is us.  Until we have immunity, we must keep to one bubble, not meet indoors with people outside our own household, not travel, always wear a mask and keep our distance when we contact people for essential activities.

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Previous Messages

First Vaccine Message

In 1796 Edward Jenner developed a vaccine against smallpox.  The concept was revolutionary,  disease prevention — rather than disease treatment after sickness occurs. This was a new approach to disease, a new era for medical care.   A vaccine — by mimicking an infectious agent such as a virus or bacteria, would stimulate the body’s immune system to create a defence mechanism that would prevent an infection.

Jenner’s development was followed by a long list of vaccines — mostly developed in the 20th century, to prevent diseases such as rabies, diphtheria, plague, tetanus ,mumps, measles, polio and tuberculosis.  Staying healthy on planet earth had suddenly become much easier.  It was a revolutionary concept — to prevent, rather than to treat!

In the history of medicine, the development of vaccination will be remembered as one of our biggest stories.

It was in December 2019 that the new Covid-19 virus, escaped from Wuhan China and within 12 months spread to almost every country in the world.  Today it has infected 77 million people and killed over one and a half million.  

In early 2020, scientists in many countries embarked on accelerated programs to produce safe and effective coronavirus vaccines. The startling prospect of a devastating pandemic stimulated the most intensive vaccine development effort that the world has ever seen.  Typically, vaccines require years of research in the laboratory and then more years of clinical trials and data assessment.  Currently, worldwide,  there are 63 different Covid -19 vaccines undergoing clinical trials in humans, 11 of which have reached phase 3 trials.  

Phase 3 is the last phase of testing before widespread use.  This phase involves thousands of participants and is usually composed of a two groups — one group who gets the vaccine (active treatment group) and one group who gets a simulated vaccine — a substance which has no known effects (placebo group).  When the phase three clinical trial is completed, data and analyses are submitted to our regulatory authority — the Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) of Health Canada.  The vaccine is then considered for possible use in Canada. The HPFB assesses the vaccine’s efficacy, safety and possible adverse effects. Based on this data the decision to use or not will be decided by a risk/benefit analysis.  

The Government of Canada has signed agreements to establish a guaranteed supply of at least six different potential vaccines — up to a total of 297 million doses — pending each vaccine’s trial completion  and Health Canada’s regulatory approvals.

Phase 4 trials are done after the drug is approved, is being used, and this phase is starting at this time.  The purpose of this phase is to gather more information on the best ways to use a drug, its long-term benefits and possible risks to the population based on a much wider use than in phase 3.

The Ontario Ministry of Health has developed a priority selection protocol for vaccine recipients — the first priority is to vaccinate health care workers and essential caregivers who work in hospitals, long-term care homes, and retirement homes that take care of seniors, and the residents of these homes.  Next will be other health care workers, and then the population as a whole.

The logistics and administration of the vaccine roll out is a huge undertaking.  The coordination of people, facilities, supplies and vaccine administration is the responsibility of the Covid-19 Vaccination Distribution Task Force — an advisory committee to the Ontario Ministry of Health.  This committee is chaired by General (retired) Rick Hillier, former Chief of Defence Staff for the Canadian Forces.

Very recently, Canada approved for use, two vaccines – Pfizer-BioNTech,  and Moderna.   Last week Ontario received 6,000 doses of Pfizer BNT162 vaccine.  Two thousand, three hundred Health care workers were vaccinated.  Within the next few weeks, Ontario will receive 90,000 additional doses of the Pfizer vaccine and will use 17 Ontario hospitals to continue to vaccinate the first priority group.  In early 2021, the province expects to receive 2.4 million doses, including the Moderna vaccine — allowing vaccination of 1.2 million people. The future availability of vaccines for the population at large is not known at this time but will likely be early in the spring of 2021.

Some important questions which require clear answers will be dealt with in a subsequent message. These include — how effective and for how long can vaccination prevent or weaken infection? What and how serious are the side effects? And who should and should not get the vaccine?

Waterway Signing Survey

Please view the pictures & map below and use the intersections, roads, etc. for geographical context. There is a spot to fill in any alternative current, historical, or colloquial names of the rivers/streams/creeks/etc.

Personal information on this form is collected under the authority of the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and will be used for the purposes of collecting alternative names for waterways for potential inclusion in signage. Questions about this collection should be directed to the Clerk’s Office: ClerksOffice@townofmono.com, 347209 Mono Centre Road, Mono ON L9W 6S3, 519.941.3599.

Please fill out your contact your preferences: phone and/or email

Reference Map for All Waterways

29 Road Crossings Selected for Signage

Please provide a list of name corrections or alternatives in the fields. Please separate each name with a comma (,).

Graphic representation of a stream

10 Other Road Crossings Not Selected

Please provide a list of name corrections or alternatives in the fields. Please separate each name with a comma (,).

↑ Go Back to Reference Map

Are there any of the above "10 Other Road Crossings Not Selected", that you feel should be selected for signage. Please reference the stream number from the previous section. Provide one waterway per line and include the reason why you feel the additional waterways should be signed.

From what resources did you obtain the information? Please let us know if there would be an opportunity for the Town to examine the resources. If you are listing multiple resources, please list one resource per line.

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An Informational Guide to Town of Mono's New Checkout Bag Bylaw

Please select whether you are a Resident / Member of the General Public or a Business

Information for Residents

On January 1, 2021, you should no longer receive checkout bags from stores in Mono. You may only receive a bag if:

  • You are first asked whether you need a bag and you respond that you require one
  • The bag you receive is a paper bag
  • You must pay for the bag

Businesses must allow you to use any reusable bag that you may already have, including bags from competitors.

Woman receiving purchased products in reusable bag

Are There Any Exceptions? 

You may still receive bags in situations when the bag is being used to do any of the following:

  • Package loose bulk items, such as fruit / vegetables, nuts, grains, or candy;
  • Package loose small hardware items such as nails and bolts;
  • Contain or wrap frozen foods, meat, poultry or fish;
  • Wrap flowers or potted plants;
  • Protect prepared foods or bakery goods that are not already packaged;
  • Contain prescription drugs received from a pharmacy;
  • Transport live fish;
  • Protect linens, bedding, or other similar large items that cannot easily fit in a reusable bag;
  • Protect newspapers or other printed material that may be left outside;
  • Protect clothes after laundering or dry cleaning;
  • Protect tires that cannot easily fit in a reusable bag;
  • Collect and dispose of animal waste

You may also receive small paper bags at no charge for smaller purchases.

For more information, view the Plastic Bag Bylaw.

Remember Your Bags Graphic

Information for Businesses

On January 1, 2021, you should no longer provide checkout bags to customers. You may only supply a bag if:

  • You first ask customers whether they need a bag and they respond that they require one
  • The bag you provide to customers is a paper bag
  • Customers must pay for the bag. Businesses can set whatever price they feel is appropriate for these bags.

Customers should be allowed to use any reusable bag that they may already have, including bags from competitors.

Customer receiving purchases in a reusable bag

Are There Any Exceptions? 

You may still provide bags in the following situations if the bags do any of the following:

  • Package loose bulk items, such as fruit / vegetables, nuts, grains, or candy;
  • Package loose small hardware items such as nails and bolts;
  • Contain or wrap frozen foods, meat, poultry or fish;
  • Wrap flowers or potted plants;
  • Protect prepared foods or bakery goods that are not already packaged;
  • Contain prescription drugs received from a pharmacy;
  • Transport live fish;
  • Protect linens, bedding, or other similar large items that cannot easily fit in a reusable bag;
  • Protect newspapers or other printed material that may be left outside;
  • Protect clothes after laundering or dry cleaning;
  • Protect tires that cannot easily fit in a reusable bag;
  • Collect and dispose of animal waste

You may also provide a small paper bag at no charge for small purchases.

Penalties

Contravening the new Plastic Bag Bylaw will result in a fine of $150. Any person who is charged with multiple or repeat offences under this Bylaw is liable to the following fines if found guilty under Part 3 of the Provincial Offences Act:

  • $500 for each day or part day that the offence continues, limited to $10,000
  • $500 for each offence in a case of multiple offences and the total of all fines for each included offence is limited to $10,000

For more information, view the Plastic Bag Bylaw.

We're Listening

We are interested to hear about what the switch away from plastic will mean for you at checkouts. What changes will you as a customer or a business need to take? What supports may be helpful? Let us know in the comments. We are ready for your feedback and we are listening.


Comments & Feedback

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