About Mono

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Who We Are

We are a rural community in both geography and character. Travelling through town you will marvel at the rolling hills and the many streams and creeks which form the headwaters of three rivers; - the Humber and Credit that flow to Lake Ontario and the Nottawasaga that bends north to Georgian Bay. Additionally, Mono forms a portion of the headwaters of the Grand River, which flows to Lake Erie. This gives rise to the Town's slogan, 'the heart of the headwaters'.

The Heart of the Headwaters

Mono is best known for its spectacular landscape of escarpment, villages and tree-covered rolling hills. The UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve designated Niagara Escarpment informs the character of town providing breathtaking views. With our kilometres of trails you will find yourself invigorated by our natural beauty, rejuvenated by our boundless recreational opportunities and inspired by our eclectic artisans.

Find yourself, lose yourself, be yourself

Where We Live

The Town of Mono is situated in south-central Ontario, Canada, at the south-east corner of County of Dufferin, just north of Caledon and northeast of Orangeville. It stretches from Highway 9 along its southern border to Highway 89 along its northern border. Its border to the west is with the Township of Amaranth and in the east it is bordered by the Township of Adjala-Tosorontio.

 

 

The Hockley Valley, running north-east from Highway #10 right across the municipality, is well-known for its natural beauty. For those interested in hiking, the Bruce Trail enters Mono at Highway #9 just east of Airport Road and meanders over the countryside through two Provincial parks up to Primrose where it crosses Highway #89 and continues its course north. Mono Cliffs Provincial Park contains part of the Niagara Escarpment, with its trails for summer hikers and winter cross-country skiers that are well maintained by the Ministry of Natural Resources. Hiking and skiing are also available in Monora Park on Highway #10/24 at the south end of Mono.

Mono's residents live on farms, rural estates and in small settlements. Mono Centre, Hockley and Camilla are just some of the small communities which lie within the Town of Mono.

It’s hard to believe that such a pastoral setting is just 45 minutes north of the metropolis, Toronto. A thousand shades of green paint the hillsides of Mono, excepting the winter months when everything is tucked in under a blanket of snow. Mono's diverse landscape was most recently sculpted when the glaciers retreated, leaving deep river valleys, abundant clear freshwater streams, cliffs and crevices.

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What's In A Name?

Portrait of Sir Peregrine Maitland

The original Township of Mono was incorporated in 1850, though mention was made as far back as 1821 in the legislation that created Simcoe County. Simcoe County was later partitioned, along with Wellington County, to form the County of Dufferin. In 1999 Mono changed from a Township, officially becoming the Town of Mono on May 14th of that year.

Sketch of Shawnee chief Tecumseh

Considerable speculation surrounds the origin of the name Mono. It is suggested that Sir Peregrine Maitland, Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada from 1818 to 1828, and who had served in Spain, had a fondness for foreign names, may have named the township after the Spanish word for monkey: mono.

Some people claim that Mono was named after a daughter of the Shawnee chief Tecumseh; however, this interpretation has been challenged as historically inaccurate, citing that Tecumseh only had one child, a son named Pageshashenwa. Mulmur Township, located adjacent to Mono to the north, is said to be named after Tecumseh's son though this is by no means definitive. Another explanation is that Mono was named after the Gaelic word monadh, meaning hilly or hill-pasture.

In his book published in 1930 Indian Place Names in Ontario, Captain William Francis Moore further suggests that Mono may have taken its name from the Indian word Mahnoo meaning "let it be so". Though he does not specifically attribute it, Moore likely took the meaning of Mahnoo from Elijah Middlebrook Haines' treatise on the culture and language of North American Indians titled, The American Indian (Un-nish-in-na-ba). The Whole Subject Complete In One Volume published in 1888.

The origins of the name Mono may be lost in the sands of time; though, if you have any further insight, we would love to hear from you.

Town Crest

The Town crest was designed by Mr. William. J. Bakker in 1981 in a project celebrating the centennial year of Dufferin County.

Town Crest

  • The maple leaves at the top are reproduced from the County of Dufferin Coat of Arms and signify that Mono is one of its constituent municipalities, in addition to their symbolism of Canada itself.
  • The plough is a historical recognition of the farming pioneers who settled Mono and of the continued importance of agriculture in the municipality.
  • The three fish represent the three major rivers whose headwaters rise in Mono: the Credit, the Humber and the Nottawasaga, and also the abundant wildlife.
  • The tree represents Mono’s forests and natural beauty.
  • The skier represents the availability of recreational activities in Mono and the rolling terrain which constitutes much of the landscape.

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Town of Mono Strategic Plan

Vision Statement

The Town of Mono will be a safe, sustainable municipality where the new Economy, our Environment, our Community and our Natural Heritage can flourish in harmony.

Mission Statement

Town of Mono Council and Municipal Officials commit:

  • to preserve the natural heritage bequeathed to us by earlier generations,
  • to provide services to residents that are safe, sustainable and affordable, and
  • to balance our environment and economic success in a respectful and equitable manner.

The 3 E's

The Town has established three ‘themes’ as over-riding goals which are entrenched as corporate policy and that must be achieved in the following order for any proposal to proceed.

  • Protect our environment and rural character.
  • Ensure economic sustainability of our decisions.
  • Honour our commitments and be equitable in our dealings with stakeholders and others.

We call these goals the Three E's:

  • Environment
  • Economy
  • Equity

These are the tests we put ourselves, and others doing business with us, to with the order being as important as the tests themselves. If you can’t meet the first one ‘Environment’ you stop right there.

If you can, then we look at ‘Economic’ impact.

If you have passed both of these we look at whether it is ‘Equitable’, which has opposing forces working.

Any business or government should honour its commitments made in good faith. For example, a balance must be struck to meet the needs & expectations between a developing land owner and his neighbours whose interests are often in conflict.

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Demographics

The Town occupies 277.78 square km. According to the 2011 Census, Mono's population is 7,546 residing in 2,832 households. Of those over 25, 65% hold a postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree. The average household income in Mono is $163,961.

The 2011 census indicated a population growth of 6.7% from 2006. This compares to the national average growth of 5.9%.

Land area is 277.78 square kilometres with a population density of 27.2 persons per square kilometre. This compares to the provincial land area of 908,607.67 square kilometres with a population density of 14.1 persons per square kilometre.

In 2011, Mono had 2,558 private dwellings occupied by usual residents. The change in private dwellings occupied by usual residents from 2006 was 9.3%. For Canada as a whole, the number of private dwellings occupied by usual residents increased 7.1%.

Age distribution

In 2011, the percentage of the population aged 65 and over in Mono was 14.4%, compared with a national percentage of 14.8%. The percentage of the working age population (15 to 64) was 69.5% and the percentage of children aged 0 to 14 was 16.0%. In comparison, the national percentages were 68.5% for the population aged 15 to 64 and 16.7% for the population aged 0 to 14.

Age distribution
Age distributions by broad age groups and sex, 2011 Census
Age groups Both sexes Males Females
0 to 14 16.0% 15.4% 16.6%
15 to 64 69.5% 69.2% 69.8%
65 and over 14.4% 15.3% 13.6%
Source: Focus on Geography Series, 2011 Census, Mono, ON
Reproduced and distributed on an "as is" basis with the permission of Statistics Canada.

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Population by broad age groups and sex

The table below shows population counts by broad age groups and sex.

Broad age groups by sex Population
2011 2006 change % change
Both sexes
Total 7,550 7,070 480 6.8
0 to 14 1,210 1,325 -115 -8.7
15 to 64 5,250 4,920 330 6.7
65 and over 1,090 830 260 31.3
Males
Total 3,825 3,580 245 6.8
0 to 14 590 655 -65 -9.9
15 to 64 2,645 2,480 165 6.7
65 and over 585 450 135 30.0
Females
Total 3,725 3,490 235 6.7
0 to 14 620 670 -50 -7.5
15 to 64 2,600 2,440 160 6.6
65 and over 505 380 125 32.9
Source: Focus on Geography Series, 2011 Census, Mono, ON
Reproduced and distributed on an "as is" basis with the permission of Statistics Canada.

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Population by five-year age groups and sex

Population by five-year age groups and sex

Age groups Both sexes Males Females
Total - All age groups 7,550 3,825 3,725
0 to 4 years 275 145 130
5 to 9 years 395 185 205
10 to 14 years 540 265 280
15 to 19 years 610 330 280
20 to 24 years 490 260 225
25 to 29 years 240 125 115
30 to 34 years 210 115 90
35 to 39 years 355 165 185
40 to 44 years 540 260 280
45 to 49 years 795 395 400
50 to 54 years 750 360 390
55 to 59 years 650 325 330
60 to 64 years 610 305 300
65 to 69 years 410 210 195
70 to 74 years 295 155 140
75 to 79 years 205 125 80
80 to 84 years 110 65 50
85 years and over 70 30 40
Median age 45.9 45.9 45.8
Source: Focus on Geography Series, 2011 Census, Mono, ON
Reproduced and distributed on an "as is" basis with the permission of Statistics Canada.

Median Age is age where half the population is older and half is younger. It is the age that divides a population in two groups of the same population size, one group being older than age 'x' and the other group being younger than age 'x', where 'x' is the median age.

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Median age of the population

In 2011, the median age in Mono was 45.9 years. In comparison, the median age of Ontario was 40.4 years.

Median age of the population
  Median age
2006 2011
Canada 39.5 40.6
Ontario 39.0 40.4
Mono 42.5 45.9
Source: Focus on Geography Series, 2011 Census, Mono, ON
Reproduced and distributed on an "as is" basis with the permission of Statistics Canada.
 

Median Age is age where half the population is older and half is younger. It is the age that divides a population in two groups of the same population size, one group being older than age 'x' and the other group being younger than age 'x', where 'x' is the median age.

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Families and households

Families and households

In 2011, the number of census families in Mono was 2,300, which represents a change of 7.5% from 2006. This compares to a growth rate for Canada of 5.5% over the same period.

In Mono, 82.0% of census families were married couples in 2011, while 10.0% were common-law-couples and 8.0% were lone-parent families.

Geographic name Total families Married-couple families Common-law-couple families Lone-parent families % change, census families, 2006 to 2011
number % number % number %
Canada 9,389,695 6,293,950 67.0 1,567,905 16.7 1,527,840 16.3 5.5
Ontario 3,612,205 2,612,890 72.3 394,670 10.9 604,645 16.7 5.5
Mono 2,300 1,885 82.0 230 10.0 185 8.0 7.5
Caledon 17,250 13,895 80.6 1,415 8.2 1,940 11.2 3.8
Amaranth 1,160 910 78.4 140 12.1 115 9.9 1.8
Orangeville 7,895 5,325 67.4 1,055 13.4 1,510 19.1 3.5
Mulmur 1,050 810 77.1 135 12.9 110 10.5 5.0
Melancthon 820 595 72.6 135 16.5 95 11.6 -5.2
Adjala-Tosorontio 3,150 2,420 76.8 410 13.0 320 10.2 -0.3
Source: Focus on Geography Series, 2011 Census, Mono, ON
Reproduced and distributed on an "as is" basis with the permission of Statistics Canada.
 
Marital Status

67.2% of the total population aged 15 and over were either married (59.9%) or living with a common-law partner (7.3%).

The remaining 32.7% were not married and not living with a common-law partner, including those who were single (never-married), separated, divorced or widowed.

Among couples (married and common-law), 47.2% were couples with children aged 24 and under at home. In comparison, as a whole, 46.9% of couples in Canada had children aged 24 and under at home.

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Education

In 2011, 61.3% of the 5,195 adults aged 25 years and over in Mono had completed some form of postsecondary education, compared with 59.6% at the national level.

Of the population aged 25 years and over in Mono, 27.1% had a university certificate or degree. An additional 23.6% had a college diploma and 10.7% had a trades certificate.

The share of the adult population that had completed a high school diploma as their highest level of educational attainment was 26.6%, and 12.0% had completed neither high school nor any postsecondary certificates, diplomas or degrees.

Level of Education

Highest level of educational attainment Mono
Number %
Total – Population aged 25 years and over 5,195 100.0
No certificate, diploma or degree 625 12.0
High school diploma 1,380 26.6
Postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree 3,185 61.3
Trades certificate 555 10.7
Trades certificate or diploma (other than apprenticeship) 295 5.7
Registered Apprenticeship certificate 265 5.1
College diploma 1,225 23.6
University certificate below bachelor 240 4.6
University degree 1,170 22.5
Bachelor's degree 760 14.6
University certificate above bachelor 105 2.0
Degree in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or optometry 80 1.5
Master's degree 195 3.8
Earned doctorate 30 0.6
Source: Focus on Geography Series, 2011 Census, Mono, ON
Reproduced and distributed on an "as is" basis with the permission of Statistics Canada.
 

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TOWN OF MONO Social Media icons © 2016 Town of Mono
347209 Mono Centre Road (Dufferin County Road #8) | Mono,ON, L9W 6S3
Phone: (519) 941-3599 | Fax: (519) 941-9490   
Email: [email protected]
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